Self-Compassion & Appreciation

compassion childs pose.jpg

Day 3: Self-Compassion (Appreciation)

“If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.” -Dalai Lama

Mothers and Fathers, Sons and Daughters. It’s easier to extend compassion to those we love, but Compassion itself can be a difficult emotion to grasp. Compassion literally means “to suffer together.” Among emotion researchers, it is defined as the feeling that arises when you are confronted with another’s suffering and feel motivated to relieve that suffering.

Compassion is not the same as empathy or altruism, though the concepts are related. While empathy refers more generally to our ability to take the perspective of and feel the emotions of another person, compassion is when those feelings and thoughts include the desire to help. Altruism, in turn, is the kind, selfless behavior often prompted by feelings of compassion, though one can feel compassion without acting on it, and altruism isn’t always motivated by compassion.

Scientists have started to map the biological basis of compassion, suggesting its deep evolutionary purpose. This research has shown that when we feel compassion, our heart rate slows down, we secrete the “bonding hormone” oxytocin, and regions of the brain linked to empathycaregiving, and feelings of pleasure light up, which often results in our wanting to approach and care for other people.

So what is self-compassion? What does it mean exactly?

Self-compassion has three core components. First, it requires self-kindness, that we be gentle and understanding with ourselves rather than harshly critical and judgmental. Second, it requires recognition of our common humanity, feeling connected with others in the experience of life rather than feeling isolated and alienated by our suffering. Third, it requires mindfulness—that we hold our experience in balanced awareness, rather than ignoring our pain or exaggerating it. We must achieve and combine these three essential elements in order to be truly self-compassionate.

This means that unlike self-esteem, the good feelings of self-compassion do not depend on being special and above average, or on meeting ideal goals. Instead, they come from caring about ourselves—fragile and imperfect yet magnificent as we are. Rather than pitting ourselves against other people in an endless comparison game, we embrace what we share with others and feel more connected and whole in the process. And the good feelings of self-compassion don’t go away when we mess up or things go wrong. In fact, self-compassion steps in precisely where self-esteem lets us down—whenever we fail or feel inadequate.

TOOLS FOR SELF-COMPASSION

Take a few moments out of your day to complete this Mindful Exercises Worksheet and keep it close to you throughout the day.

https://positivepsychologyprogram.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/self-compassion.pdf

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